General Practitioners may be Bad for one’s emotional Health

General Practitioners may be Bad for one’s emotional Health!

 

Seven days ago my Patient Information Leaflet saga began and, on this the seventh day, I received an early morning telephonic communication from the medical practice. Once again it was a receptionist making the call and she duly read out a (quite lengthy) statement from the prescribing doctor declaring his infallibility. It actually stated that he was well aware of side-effect and contra-indications but as he was prescribing a very low dose (100mg when the capsules are made in only 50 & 100mg); I would have considered 50mg to be very low dose in this instance.

 

My primary concern was the positive declaration that one should not take this medication if they’ve taken the specific medication I was on within the last two weeks. Of course being some sort of God the GP obviously didn’t feel it was worthwhile to deal with this specific.

 

Of course it was said that I could arrange an appointment with said doctor to discuss the issue but, what’s the point of consulting a GP who offhandedly (as witnessed by my wife who sat in on the appointment) ignores anything the patient says if it doesn’t suit his agenda? In any case it always takes ages to get an appointment. Although I had been quite prepared to start taking the new medication two weeks after having taken the last dose of the previously prescribed ones, this wasn’t presented as an option so I now have misgivings about taking it at all, which as the receptionist says “that’s the patient’s prerogative”.

 

I can only assume that patients are supposed to ignore Patient Information leaflets, as they may prove challenging to the GPs’ omniscience.

 

 

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This entry was posted in Health and wellness, Miscellaneous/Personal, Spoonie, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to General Practitioners may be Bad for one’s emotional Health

  1. I hope your change of medication works out – if you decide to go ahead with it. As for the problem with the swap, pharmacists usually pick up on this sort of thing if the doctors don’t. You could always check with them if the two week gap is strictly necessary – though you may well decide to play safe in any case. Thanks for linking to my post – much appreciated.

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